Online gaming

Stalin says he will end online gambling in Tamil Nadu | Latest India News


The former AIADMK government under former chief minister Edappadi Palaniswami in November 2020 amended a 90-year law to ban online games, including rummy and online poker, with stakes on the grounds that teens and young adults were losing money and cited suicide cases.

There will soon be an end to online games with stakes in Tamil Nadu, Chief Minister MP Stalin told the state assembly on Thursday in response to a question from MP AIADMK R Vaithilingam.

The former AIADMK government under former chief minister Edappadi Palaniswami in November 2020 amended a 90-year law to ban online games, including rummy and online poker, with stakes on the grounds that teens and young adults were losing money and cited suicide cases.

A group of petitioners challenged this in Madras High Court and in August 2021, the bench of the court overturned the ban.

The court said the amendment is so unequivocally bold that it excludes any element of choice an individual can exercise and added that some regulation can always be exercised. Stalin stressed that cases related to online games are pending before the Supreme Court and that his government will follow a legal path to ensure a ban.

Since there have been several suicides related to online gambling and gambling, a “permanent end point” will soon be in place, Stalin said. The chief minister reiterating this position was applauded by lawmakers in the chamber.

AIADMK ally PMK founder S Ramadoss on Wednesday also urged the state government to ban the same recent suicides in the state that he said were due to the loss of money in the state. online games. Suicides shouldn’t look like a daily weather report, he said.

Last September, Karnataka became the third Indian state to ban online gambling after Tamil Nadu and Kerala by passing a law. The ban has been challenged in the Karnataka high court and the hearing is ongoing in the case.

Lawyer and cyber-law expert N Karthikeyan said gambling falls under the subject of the state so that the state can pass a law to restrict or allow a particular game, but as the problem lies in the cyberspace, a ban may not be realistic.

“Even if they pass state law, gaming and gambling apps will still be available in the App Store and Playstore,” Karthikeyan said. “Some of them are available on open source platforms so that they can be shared. So how will the state monitor and take action? How will they know someone is playing these games until it is reported. So banning online gambling is not a solution, but it should be limited as is done in other countries where they have limits to prevent addiction and a limit on the amount of money that can be spent on it. a day.


  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Divya Chandrababu is an award-winning political and human rights journalist based in Chennai, India. Divya is currently Associate Editor of the Hindustan Times where she covers Tamil Nadu and Puducherry. She started her career as a broadcast journalist at NDTV-Hindu where she anchored and wrote prime-time news bulletins. She later covered politics, development, mental health, children’s rights and people with disabilities for The Times of India. Divya has been a Journalism Fellow for several programs, including the Asia Journalism Fellowship in Singapore and the KAS Media Asia-The Caravan for Narrative Journalism. Divya holds an MA in Politics and International Studies from the University of Warwick, UK. As a freelance journalist, Divya has written for Indian and foreign publications on national and international affairs.
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